Planning your hospital stay

Chrissie’s top tip!

Remember you are having a baby; not moving house. However it is wise to get your things together well in advance and ask your birth partner to pack the bags – because they will be getting stuff out for you and will know where everything is. Here are a few suggestions to help things go as smoothly as possible.

First things first

Two things;  please remember

  • Your handheld maternity record
  • Rear-facing baby seat

It’s a good idea to pack two separate bags

One for use in the delivery suite and the other for the postnatal ward. Delivery suite rooms are often quite small and don’t usually have space for lots of luggage.

Packing for your labour

  • T-shirt or nightie for labour; roomy, cheap, thin cotton is best. Hospital gowns are not as comfortable.
  • Clean nightie for changing into after baby’s birth
  • Lip salve
  • TENS machine if using one
  • Toiletries
  • Nappies, stretch suit, vest & baby hat
  • Something to read
  • Phone charger
  • Smartphones can be used, but please keep in silent mode to respect the needs of other families

Packing for the postnatal suite

  • Nighties (better than pyjamas)
  • Toiletries (body wash, shampoo & body lotion)
  • Dressing gown and slippers
  • Cheap cotton comfy or disposable knickers that you won’t mind throwing away These are much more comfortable than disposables.
  • Well-supporting bras, breast pads
  • Clothes for the journey home
  • 5-6 sets baby clothes; all-in-one stretch suits and vests are the most practical
  • Muslins or bibs if you’re using them
  • Baby’s blanket, hat & cardigan

Snacks for you and your birth partner

Sandwiches and hot food are available in the Lindo Wing and The Portland Hospital 24/7.

You don’t need to bring

  • Formula milk (Both hospitals stock SMA, Aptamil, Cow & Gate)
  • Bath towels, bed linen
  • Maternity pads
  • Cotton wool
  • Breast pump

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Miss Yu’s published research

Published research by Dr Chrissie Yu

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Qualifications & accreditations

In 2004, Chrissie was awarded an MD from the University of London for her research.

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